A lot of parents have concerns about online piracy, and children viewing illegal or inappropriate content online.

In a campaign last year the BBFC worked with The Industry Trust for IP Awareness on research that asked young people their views. You can read more about what young people told us about their viewing habits and concerns here.

As part of that campaign we compiled this list of tips for parents, when watching films online or letting their children access films on the internet:

1 - Start by visiting FindAnyFilm.com – a one-stop shop where you can find all films, all above board, all in one place. The website has been developed by the film industry and contains information on BBFC age ratings and BBFCinsight to help families make informed decisions about their film choices.

2 - Activate simple parental controls – it’s easy to set up access controls on laptops, tablets and smartphones, which allow you to decide if you want films with certain ratings to be password protected and it’s possible to block specific websites. If you’re not sure how, contact your Internet Service Provider for more information.

3 - Get to grips with the BBFC age ratings – visit the BBFC website for a simple guide to the age rating of films and a full copy of our Guidelines. You know children better than anyone and are the best person to decide what they should be watching.

4 - Do your homework. Some films are rated U or PG because they contain no material that is unsuitable for a particular age category, but they might not necessarily be suitable for children. Gone With The Wind (PG) is a good example. This classic Hollywood film is rated PG but it isn't intended for children.

5 - Start them young! Kids have a great love and appreciation for films. The younger they are when they understand why films have to be classified and why it’s important to access films via legal channels, the safer they will be when it comes to watching films online. There's a wealth of information on this site about age ratings and new releases including BBFCinsight. Older children studying media and film or interested in looking at age ratings in more depth can also look at our Case Studies and Education Resources sections on www.bbfc.co.uk